NGOs Try Stopping Weapon Exports to Riyadh

Weapon Exports to Riyadh

Canadian NGOs try stopping weapon exports to Riyadh, Ottawa’s second-largest non-US purchaser, as well as a primary player in the Yemen conflict. The UN has pretty much taken Canada to task for the deliveries.

39 human-rights, arms-control, and even labor associations, all of the Canadian branches of Amnesty International & Oxfam, have recently written a clear letter to Canadas PM Justin Trudeau, sounding the warning “regarding the severe ethical, lawful, unalienable rights as well as humanitarian ramifications regarding Canada’s continuous sales and delivery of military equipment to Saudi Arabia.” 

Similar appeals were already sent out to the federal government 3 times – the dates were – March 2019, Aug 2019, and even April 2020 – however, “all three were left unanswered”, the signatories pointed out.

Canada’s arms transport/sales to the Saudi empire who leads a league of Arab countries battling with Shia Houthi militias – have already doubled since 2018, now up to $2.9 billion dollars during 2019, the document claims. Riyadh is the biggest receiver of Canadian armed goods aside from the United States.

Germany extends arms embargo to Saudi Arabia – EURACTIV.com

Amazingly, arms transport/sales to Saudi Arabia today make up in excess of 75% of Canada’s non-US army foreign trade that takes place in spite of Canada being a fully-fledged registered member of the 2014 Arms Trade Agreement (ATT) that calls for parties to guarantee weapons they sell do not abuse existing arms trade embargo’s or used for human-rights wrongdoings/violations.

Ottawa suspended arms trade to Riyadh following the passing/death of reporter Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi government office at Istanbul, however, restarted all of them this April, pointing out they are trying to keep 1000s of jobs “not necessarily just within Southwestern Ontario but likewise throughout the overall self-defense market supply chain, that includes numerous “modest/smaller and average size business.”

The publishing/letter identified a number of countries providing military arms that fuel the terrible battle in Yemen, which has already killed 112,000, including 12,000 noncombatants since 2014.

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